Arts & Culture, Shopping & Consumption

Muni’s 7 Picks from Manila FAME


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Muni on this:

What if more than styling your home and planning your wardrobe, you can use, wear or carry a story of our culture and/or an environmental statement?

Manila FAME is the biggest trade fair in the Philippines for sourcing design forward, high-quality products. Walking through the  halls of SMX last March 14-17 can make any Filipino’s heart swell with pride in the creativity and skill of our local designers and artisans.

Here, we’ll share our top picks for conscious consumption, showcasing things you can use on a regular basis – maximizing the resources put into making the product, and of course, the money you’ll be investing in it as well.

TEXTILE
Inabel Textiles from Ilocos by Balay Ni Atong

MNL FAME Inabel

These textiles from Balay ni Atong are finely, finely woven, and a lot of stories lie in the wefts and warps and motives of these tapestries, which while largely used as blankets can be used on anything for the home, from pillows, to headboards to wall hangings, and would be interesting applications on clothing and accessories as well. The more uses we find for these beautiful textiles, the more we can preserve this tradition.

CLOTHING
Embroidered Everyday Wear by Anne & Anna

MNL FAME Anne & Anna

Anne & Anna‘s beautifully embroidered kaftans and shirt dresses exemplify the rich tradition and skill of the artisans in Batangas & Laguna. Hopefully, by incorporating this art onto more everyday pieces instead of just barongs or piña for weddings or special occasions, this will help keep the art of hand embroidery alive.

BAGS
Upcycled Fabric Meets Indigenous Textiles by Rags2Riches

MNL FAME 3

Initially known for its use of excess fabric from factories, support for nanays in Payatas, and collaborations with high profile Filipino designers like Rajo Laurel and Amina Aranaz, Rags2Riches birthed its own in-house collection Newel, which is T’boli for “weave”. This new line interlaces R2R’s classic weave with indigenous t’nalak textiles from Mindanao, resulting in an array of vibrant, eye-catching bags for day & night.

ACCESSORIES
Upcycled Forest Debris Beads by Floreia
Upcycled Paper Beads by Lumago Designs

We’re not so hot on jewelry in general, but when they’re as genius as this, we have to consider them! Especially when they don’t use shells (which are essentially what make up sand and provide nutrients for marine life)!

mnl floreia

Floreia‘s patented technique utilizes forest debris (random bark, twigs or branches that fall off trees) and turns them into beads. The technology can also be translated onto a host of other things for your home as well and creates a material that is fairly durable and surprisingly lightweight. MNL Lumago

Lumago Designs‘ technique may seem less sophisticated than Floreia’s but it employs a lot of creativity and heart. Using old magazine, pull tabs, and plastic containers from a Dumaguete dumpsite, and upcycled leather from ukay-ukays, Lumago ladies combine paper beads, colored only by the magazine pages’ actual color, with other materials to create one of a kind pieces.

FURNITURE & FIXTURES
A Fresh Take on Solihiya by Ito Kish
Repurposed Found Objects by Resurrection Furniture

MNL FAME Ito Kish Remember the woven rattan that usually accompanies your lola or lola‘s chairs? In case you didn’t know, that weaving tradition is called solihiya. And while it used to be a taken-for-granted addition to millenial Filipino homes, Ito Kish‘s rendition brings the sexy back to solihiya with his Basilisa Collection using various solihiya patterns applied on contemporary furniture design, preserving and elevating the status of this tradition in the eyes of Filipinos and foreigners alike.

mnl resurrection

Resurrection was featured as one of the “creative hotspots” outside the halls of Manila FAME. Their creations, albeit not as refined as the other pieces within the furniture hall, exhibit their vision and ingenuity in finding new, very wantable uses for otherwise old, very unwanted objects to be discarded in a landfill. Who would have thought that your old, outdated, bulky computer could look cool again?

Check out some other photos from Manila FAME here.

There was so much more to see but we guess you’ll just have to go to the next Manila FAME in October this year. Let’s continue celebrating Filipino craftsmanship and ingenuity!

What were your favorite Manila FAME finds?
What other brands/products do you think should have a spot on the world stage as well?
Share your thoughts. Leave a comment! 🙂

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